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Lofty Home Goals: Treehouses Build on Sustainability

It’s every kid’s dream to live in a treehouse, but many adults are grounded by traditional housing. That’s starting to change, however, as people climb into sustainable treehouse living. These towering structures are overseeing a new style of home construction that’s focused on sustainability

Treehouse Lifestyles

Treehouses offer an entirely different lifestyle than conventional ground housing. Cultures around the world have been building homes in the trees for centuries. This type of dwelling was once a necessity, offering greater protection from wild animals or enemies, but today serves a different purpose. Most modern treehouses are a luxurious fantasy. People rent them for a few nights on vacation or construct them as a personal retreat.

Treehouses are emerging as an eco-friendly option for permanent housing. Professional treehouse builders and the World Treehouse Association are helping to make treehouse dream homes a reality. Treehouse builders have additional incentives to prioritize sustainability in their structures. Part of a treehouse’s appeal is the way it blends into its natural surroundings. The best way to create a harmonious look between modern treehouse and the neighboring trees is to build with sustainable materials.

Sustainable Materials

The materials used in treehouse construction are often repurposed from old buildings. Barn wood, wooden pallets, and scrap lumber are a cost-effective way to get supplies without leaving a large carbon footprint. Some eco-friendly treehouses are built solely with salvaged materials and feature solar panels for electricity. Double-glazed windows that keep the heat inside your treehouse and make it more energy-efficient are often included in the treehouse design.

The hard, durable timber that’s usually used to make treehouses is called teak. Although it’s an effective construction material, this wood is starting to be replaced with a more eco-friendly option. Kebony is a sustainable alternative to hardwood that’s common among treehouse builders. This timber material is a bio-based liquid that permanently enhances softwood to make it more durable.

Treehouse communities take advantage of eco-friendly technology in a variety of ways. This means using low-energy lightbulbs and taking advantage of the tree’s natural breezes for cooling. Grey water management systems help reduce and reuse water for the whole community. Biodigesters are installed to help break down human waste. A biodigester is like the human stomach. Basically, it decomposes organic material.

Grow Your Treehouse with an Organized Plan

Before you head out to your backyard and start building, it’s important to think everything through. A treehouse tree must be able to support the weight of the structure. Consider who will be using the treehouse, how high off the ground it will be and how remote the location is. A professional arborist can help you identify which tree will be your best option. They can also assist in pruning branches and clearing a space for your new home.

Start with a detailed sketch of your treehouse and the materials you will need for construction. This will keep you organized and help construction run more smoothly. Remember, your project has the additional challenge of floating several feet above the ground. Proper planning reduces the risk of injury. Put the most time and attention into constructing a solid base for your treehouse. The base structure is your treehouse foundation. Everything else will be secured to the base, so you want it to stand firm.

Treehouses are setting a new standard of sustainable living. These lofty homes are built with eco-friendliness and innovation at every step. Whether you’re a young child or you’re young at heart, don’t let traditional houses ground your dreams of living in a treehouse.